The Thames @ Twickers

Spent a grey day in Twickenham, on our current vagabonding experience in the UK….

A bit of a grey day, but thought I’d try the effects on the camera. Swans and pigeons and, of course, Canadian geese!

Thames @ Twickers(2)

Thames @ Twickers(1)
Just to the right of the shots, is a pub, where many a summer evening was whiled away, as the sun went down, with a pint in hand.

In fact, along the Richmond/Twickenham stretch of the River Thames, many a pub was frequented as we strolled along, or cycled. Not that it’s all about the pubs, but after a days fishing on the water, or a walk on a sunny afternoon, some pub grub and a pint can’t easily be beaten.

I’m on the lookout for a decent Ploughman’s now. Any suggestions?

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Stream Between Houses.

In this West Country village you might be tempted to think the stream between the houses is a lovely feature and, as a trout fisherman,  I might be tempted.  However….

 Stream Between Houses.

What happens when the floods come and the water rises rapidly?

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The Kingfisher

Note And Photo From:- Fred, Brighton, UK

We were fishing on the Wye and sport was very slow. We were catching nothing and it was our last day before returning home.

Then, this little chap came and sat on my rod.

the wye march 07 043

He looked around surveying his territory and decided to stay and use the rod as a”diving board” to take fish from the shoals of Bleak that were in the swim.

the wye march 07 044

Cheeky “git” caught a number of fish, using the rod as a perch, whilst I didn’t get a bite all day.

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Expecting A Take

The flyline sits in quiet expectation upon the water surface.

Somewhere below the Chironomid works it’s magic in about 20 ft of water.

Will the fish see it? Will the fish take it? All is hope and trust that you have done everything right and all the possibilities have converged to the one inevitable. The line will shoot forward and the strike will set the old Hardy pulsing as the Trout ( hopefully a Kamloops ) tries to regain freedom.

It doesn’t realise it’s eating qualities or it might fight harder, but I have no wish to kill it. It is enough to convince the Trout to take the nymph, enjoy the fight and marvel at the brilliance.

The scenery is superb as the sun shines upon the trees by this BC lake and the Osprey has put in an appearance.

Who could ask for more?.

A Flooded River Ouse

The winter weather was cold and wet. Somewhere down in the depths fish would be hiding from the great push of flood water.


Where to fish was not the only problem, safety and possibility were also factors to consider.

The banks were treacherous and the amount of weight needed to hold bottom made the Pool out of bounds.

Perhaps the water above the Sea Trout ladder would be more productive.

This was certainly the case as the speed of the current was less as the water backed up to the main weir I found a spot to the right of the ladder and legered with a small Drennan feeder and maggots. It took a few re-fills, with 10 maggots a time in the little feeder, but eventually the small Shimano quiver went slowly round. A roach of about 6 oz came to hand. It looked surprised and felt warmer than I expected. The water temperature was good despite the biting wind trying to freeze me. I hoped the thermal suit would do it’s stuff and I wouldn’t need a toilet break.

At one point the sun tried desperately in vain to break through the clouds, but my success continued as more small roach and several bream came to the net.

A Breamore Barbel.

A trip to Breamore on a fine September afternoon. The river ran with such enthusiasm and was full of promise.

The old Mk IV Avon was pressed into service with a Match Ariel. My standard set up was always a link leger consisting of Swan Shot and a hook of size 8 or 6. Why carry a lot of tackle? Bait on this occasion was corn packed on to the hook, with some hemp and corn in a bait dropper.

Once the bait had settled in the chosen swim then time could be spared for the surroundings. There was the view, the calling Buzzard and then the sight of that great bird. There was that bankside terror, The Little Grebe and all the other birds taht swam past in the parade.

Pride of place went to the tip of the old cane rod which gently nodded in time with the pull of water flowing past. The gentle nodding became a rattle and a slight pull downwards, with an answering lift of the rod. Now the battle had begun and attached to the line was the barbel which had been expected.

Poole Harbour, England

Poole Harbour
( Photograph and Article submitted
by F. Sutton, Bournemouth, UK )

Once the second largest natural harbour in the World. It was behind Sydney, Australia until the Sydney Opera House was built and land was reclaimed from the sea. That loss of water put Poole where it belongs on top.

Poole Harbour

Now you can wander around the harbour and take in the view from the Park or the road around he eastern side. There is the Quay Side where you can enjoy wonderful fish and chips whilst you watch the harbour at work or the ferry as it leaves. If solitude is what you seek then cross to the western shores and walk around the heathland and the Country Park.

For the sailor or fisherman your choices are endless and only require an input from you. If you like to see the unusual then cross to Brownsea Island and spot the Red Squirrel.

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The White Cliffs Of England

 

The White Cliffs Of England
(Photograph submitted by F.Sutton, Bournemouth, UK)

The White Cliffs of England

 

Everything we expect from the South Coast of England. Those wonderful white cliffs with the tough grass on top. A slight haze with the yacht setting sail for distant lands and the Sea-Gulls calling from above.
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