Poole Harbour, England

Poole Harbour
( Photograph and Article submitted
by F. Sutton, Bournemouth, UK )

Once the second largest natural harbour in the World. It was behind Sydney, Australia until the Sydney Opera House was built and land was reclaimed from the sea. That loss of water put Poole where it belongs on top.

Poole Harbour

Now you can wander around the harbour and take in the view from the Park or the road around he eastern side. There is the Quay Side where you can enjoy wonderful fish and chips whilst you watch the harbour at work or the ferry as it leaves. If solitude is what you seek then cross to the western shores and walk around the heathland and the Country Park.

For the sailor or fisherman your choices are endless and only require an input from you. If you like to see the unusual then cross to Brownsea Island and spot the Red Squirrel.

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Wading And Fishing In The Okanagan

Photograph and Article submitted by Kelowna Trout Angler, BC, Canada

Here we stand in the beautiful water of the Okanagan. In front of us the depth drops down to about 2m, but there are fish down in the depths.

Aug1407F0922

Someone on the bank said there are few fish to be caught from the lake. Little did they know. My Grandson in the fore-ground has returned 2 Rainbow Trout and we have lost count of the Suckers we’ve sent back. Our big problem is how to catch the very large Suckers and Carp we have seen swimming in and out of the weeds in front of us.

At present we are using silver spinners in the style of the ever trusty Mepps. When the fish get suspicious a change is made and a small coloured artificial worm is added to the single hook.

Tags: , , , ,

Shoreham Beach, West Sussex, UK

Shoreham Beach, West Sussex, UK.

( Photograph and Article submitted by John, Portslade, UK )

When I was young we used to stand at this point and look across at the Gas Works and the old Electricity Building. Both of these two were demolished to make way for a smaller unit. There were fond memories of swimming in warmer water produced by the electricity outflow pipes. It probably was un-healthy, but there we are.

Shoreham Beach

The Harbour at Shoreham was always a good place to fish and sail in the sheltered waters.At times we would fish in the harbour basin if we could get away without being caught.

In the distance is Brighton and Hove. Playgrounds for the rich and famous ever since the Prince Regent built the Brighton Pavilion and put the fishing village of Brigthelmstone on the map.

 

Short Story – “One Morning in Early July”

Here is a short story, submitted by one of our readers.

Enjoy!

“One morning in early July” by Kelowna Trout Angler (Canada)

One morning in early July I rowed an old punt out onto the estate lake.

This old lake had no footpaths around it and was surrounded by trees and reeds. As my friend and I pulled out of the boathouse, which smelt of over 100 years of maintenance, creosote, pitch and tar, we got caught up in the damp webs made by a great many spiders.

Mornings are always full of promise and as we whispered quietly to each other we were able to take in the sounds of the lake and the morning. There were the ducks and other birds flapping wings and arguing as we gently slid across their domain. On early mornings you can rarely see far. There always seems to be a mist rising from the water as you await the sun.

We pulled into a bay and tied the ends of the punt to the reeds. Hopefully nothing had been disturbed and so we settled to fish.

“Hello,” said my mate, ” someone’s coming.”, and sure enough there were the sounds of oars gently dipping into the water and the occasional knock of the rowlocks as the oars turned.

The sound came upon us but we could not see the angler in the mist. He had pulled in behind us and we heard the reeds rustle to the distinctive sound of the punt being pushed into the reeds in preparation for tying.

Soon after we heard the splash of groundbait and then the tapping of a pipe on the end of an oar.

At this I called “Hello Fred”, but as usual the reply was only a grunt of acknowledgement.

We fished hard and caught many fish until the sun had cleared the mist and our bay was gradually becoming a heat trap. During our session we had heard many a splash from Fred’s side of the reeds, but the old fellow was a solitary character and rarely disclosed his catch.

Time to go I felt and we packed and called a last farewell to Fred, but no reply was forthcoming as expected.

“What a miserable sod” said my mate as we left the bay and I had to laugh.

“What’s so funny?” came the retort.

“Well he’s dead” was my reply, “he died 30 years ago and everyone on the lake should pay their respects to Fred when they arrive and leave. You’ve been lucky you have heard him and fished with him.”

If you enjoyed the article, don’t leave without posting a comment for the author. We want your feedback….

Writers, Submissions and Photos Wanted! If you want to send us a story, or an article, please submit it to editor[at]fromthewatersedge.com (Remember to change the [at] for the @ symbol, eh! Or check out the Books page for ways of earning money from your submissions, in our future publications.

Tight lines!

The Fisherman

Tags: , , ,