Oyama Lake

Note And Photo From:- Kelowna Trout Angler, Canada.

Oyama Lake

A new lake  among the 200 or so that surround the valley. There really is not enough life left to try them all, but I’ll have a go.

The Freshwater Fisheries Society of B.C. in it’s guide had stated that" Oyama was a high elevation lake( about 1341m)  and had once been the home to monster trout". That was in the past and now good access and increased pressure have seen a drop in fish size. However the B.C Fisheries still stocks 25000 triploids annually in an attempt to redress the balance. Coupled with some extra regulation and the future looks good. Excellent value from your  fishing licence. There are no day-ticket charges in B.C as one would expect in the UK.

You get out the car and observe the view. You can’t fail.

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Oyama is a large lake of about 261 Ha, depths of 24m can be seen.

On this occasion I did not take the boat and it proved to be a wise move as there were a few white caps on the waves which ran in front of the wind. The islands ( there are 27 of them ) would have provided some shelter, but I chose to walk along some of the trails and access the water wherever I could.

Jul09081237

The best places to fly fish should be around the island shoals as one would expect, but fish are still to be found along the shore. I had several pulls and finally landed a trout of about 26cms. A fish in fine form and one which gave me the enthusiasm to return.

Jul09081236

A good web site to view is the Go fish BC Freshwater Fisheries Society of BC found at www.gofishbc.com

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An Unexpected Landing

Note And Photo From:- Kelowna Trout Angler, Canada.

Carp fishing in the Okanagan.

The lilies in the background had been a magnet for the Carp and I had taken full advantage of the opportunity. Sitting on the shingle had been a pleasure as the evening sun went down.

Each tree had been used as a vantage point for an Osprey as it systematically checked every spot for an easy meal. Coots and various ducks had fought their  way across the weed beds in attempts to gain the best places to rest up and sample the free offerings from the weed.

A Coyote could be seen up in the vineyards and occasionally a Muskrat would raise it’s head to surprise the ducks.

But the surprised widlife was nothing compared to mine, when in the early morning I returned to find this strange bird of prey sitting in the very swim I had vacated only a few hours earlier.

Jun28074912

It seems the propeller had snapped and the plane came down. Everyone was ok.

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Fishing the Wye Valley

 Note From:- T.J. from the UK

Fishing the Wye Valley

  
Having fished various waters in Wales for a number of years, I was introduced early in 2007 to the River Wye by my good friend, Fred.  Within a few hours I became intoxicated not only by the river, but by the magnificent scenery and abundance of wildlife from butterflies, Kingfishers, Buzzards and the Red Kite, to rabbits and deer.  It is all there for you to see. 
 
The area that Fred and I have explored and fished is from Hay-on-Wye upstream to Rhayader. Miles of river that changes its mood around every bend and along its straights, from fast water tumbling over huge slabs of bedrock to long glides over gravel. Pool after pool holding Salmon, Brown Trout and Grayling. To me, a flyfisher, it is a tremendous experience to which I intend to return at every opportunity.
 
Recently, much more of the river has opened its doors to the coarse angler. Barbel into double figures, huge Chub and shoals of Dace and Rudd are there to be caught.  I was lucky in taking a 6lb Chub on a # 12 Pheasent Tail nymph whilst fishing for trout.  Most of this area is open to day ticket anglers thanks to organised associations like the Wye and Usk Foundation.  A more helpful group of people I have yet to meet. Call into their office in Builth Wells – they will put you right.
 
A visit to the Elan Valley, the headwaters of the Wye, is a must.  A wonderful place and so are the Trout in the many feeder streams.  Fish to a 1 1/2lb are not uncommon.  A great day out for £3 to £5 to the elderly angler. Tickets are available from the confectionery shop in the Main street in Rhayader.
 
If you should have the chance to fish the Wye do so,  it is worth the journey. There are many pubs and eating houses along the Wye’s route, great places to relax and talk after an enjoyable days fishing and a chance to meet the local Welsh people.

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A Barbel From East Maskells

Note And Photos From:- Fred, Brighton, UK

Fishing the River Ouse in Sussex.

I had fished a number of swims all to no avail. I tried every bait in the book and just about every method I could think of.  For the last hour or so I decided to fish the notoriously difficult weir pool – not a bite.

I decided enough was enough and started to pack my gear leaving the rod until last. All packed, I went to pick up the rod when it hooped over. Another ten seconds and I would have missed the only bite of the day!

Ouse Barbel 1

A new PB Barbel at 12 lb 12 oz. A new Haywards Heath Club Record and a new Ouse Record.

Ouse Barbel 2

Caught 14th February 2008.

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Redmire And Vanishing Big Fish

Note From:- Julian

This question is relevant to anywhere, not just Redmire and I believe some of you may know considerably more than I do about such matters.

A question often posed about Redmire and the huge uncaught carp, is that during the 1976 drought the pool shrunk to a much smaller size and the carp were frequently seen at the surface most of the time:- presumably due to trying to get more oxygen.

This proves the huge carp did not exist, as they would have to have been at the surface much of the time as well and would have been seen.

But would they necessarily have to spend a lot of time near the surface? I remember clearly, that time in 1976, on the pools I was fishing. There was definitely not a noticeable increase in fish near the surface and certainly not any increase in sightings of large fish at the surface. In fact the opposite appeared to occur. A lot of the time there seemed to be no signs of fish at all – and I fished frequently at the crack of dawn and in the evenings.

Is it possible that in drought conditions large fish, especially large carp, may actually tend to bed down in the mud as they would in wintertime – ie become very sluggish, torpid, and go into their almost semi-hibernation state?

My logic, though almost certainly flawed, would be that in this state the metabolism slows right down and therefore the demand for oxygen is much reduced.

Any answers please?

A bright little Perch to the fly…

Note And Photo From:- Kelowna Trout Angler

A great little fish to start the season. The sun shone and the water sparkled as I paddled around in the V-boat, with wonderful birds in the reeds, the odd Beaver raising it’s head and an Osprey diving for it’s supper. Great.

A Summer Tench….

This says it all….

An old English lake, bordering Sussex and Kent, within the sound of church bells, mist rising from the lake and the disappearance of an orange tipped quill float. An early morning summer tench, Allcocks Cane Avon rod and an Allcocks Aerial Reel.

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