It Was This Big!

Honest….

It Was This Big!....

“Caught” in the Enterprise Shopping Centre in Eastbourne, which has a number of nice little, independent shops, from crafts and health, to a fishmongers and a butchers. If you’re in the town, take the trouble to wander along and discover it yourself. You’ll find it up behind the railway station.

Lock Gates

Canals in England are fascinating.  They are man made from the efforts and hard work of a few dedicated men.  In the Industrial Age they were a vital factor in the prosperity of many regions of the UK.

Lock gates

This is an old picture of a lock which was still in use connecting parts of the canal.  The traffic at that time was purely "pleasure boats".  I think it was in the West Country somewhere, so maybe it is the Brigewater Canal.

When you stand on the towpath it’s hard to realise that there has to be a water source to supply the canal.  So I guess there must be a very slight gradient over lengths of waterway to enable the canal to function.  Any boat entering a lock must have some effect on the water level which must be compensated for from a river somewhere.

This balance between level and flow must have taxed the ingenuity of those early engineers and one can only guess at the detailed measurements and calculations which were needed.

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Fishing In Rock Pools.

Note And Photo From :- Kelowna Trout Angler.

 Fishing In Rock Pools.

For centuries there have been people enjoying fishing.  It must be one of man’s earliest activies.  Certainly fishing is depicted in Greece, Egypt and China.  In this picture the anglers are on the shores of Cyprus.  They are fishing for small fish, using the long pole which typifies many of the techniques used in Europe now and in the past.  I don’t know what they were fishing for and while I stood there no one was successful.

 Fishing In Rock Pools.

 What are the anglers seeing in the pools ? Were any of the pools better than the others ?  These are the questions we all ask when starting out to catch fish. As with all fishing it’s often a case of just being there.  Who could deny the pleasures of the warmth, the sea and the company.

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Urquhart Castle.

Note And Photo From :- Kelowna Trout Angler.

Urquhart Castle.

Scotland has some wonderful places to see and explore.

It’s an odd feeling to look down at the Urquhart Castle and Loch Ness. There are centuries of history that can be explored, but I am more concerned with the water and the atmosphere surrouding the area.

Down in the depths there lurks the fearsome ferox trout.  It lives in the deeps and patrols a shadowy world.  It’s difficult to catch, although I’m sure anglers will employ a variety of tactics to achieve success.  There is another character which shares the deep waters of the loch, the ‘monster’.  There was a time when I thought that "Nessie" was alone, but now I know there are other fabled creatures which exist in deep lakes around the world.  So Nessie may be separated from family, but not alone.

Urquhart Castle.

I do hope that Nessie’s existence remains only in the sporadic sightings of a few dedicated seachers.  If ever we can prove that monsters do exist then we will have lost something forever. Wonder and doubt are such valuable things.

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Hovercraft

Note And Photos From :- Kelowna Trout Angler.

Hovercraft.

Who can forget the Hovercraft.  There were great hopes for these giants and many believed they were to be the saviour in many marsh type environments. The invention by Cockerwill was a triumph in British technology.  I remember making small versions with biscuit tins and hair dryers, but the sight of the real thing was fantastic.

The first meeting came when I had a chance to cross the English Channel on the car transporter.  I stood on the shore and watched as this great lumbering machine pulled into the harbour, left the water and started to come up onto dry land.  It didn’t seem real, but there it was, all noise and fluttering skirts.

Cars were unloaded and people walked up the slope towards customs. We sat in our cars until the signal was given to start loading and down we went.  It was similar to that of entering any ferry. Once seated you were aware that the engines were powering up and you were starting to float.  Slowly the beast  turned and moved forward.  We were off.

Down the slope we seemed to slide until the the slight bumps told us we were on the sea and gradually entering the channel.  The power increased and the craft bucked a little as it hit the waves.  It lifted high enough to tackle the waves without too much of a problem and the forward speed increased.  Great, unless you were sea sick !  On the journey the sea swell was kind and I remember only the fantastic speed for such a large craft floating on the surface of the water. We passed the ferry and crossed in front of tankers and other large ships on their way to and from the Atlantic.  This had to be the way to travel.

Waiting at Dover.

Hovercraft at Dover

A similar experience on a lesser scale could be enjoyed crossing to the Isle of Wight.  The hovercraft was smaller, but just as impressive.

 Bound for the Isle of Wight

Hovercraft at Southsea

Now, sadly, the hovercraft is no more.  It enjoyed the affections of the public for a short while and now only survives in specialist roles and with hobbyists that keep the spirit alive.

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