Minack Theatre

14-Minack Theatre

 "Minack" in Cornish means a rocky place and the black headed crag below the theatre has always drawn local fishermen. Until the 1930’s they had the gorse filled gully to themselves and the cliffs echoed to the cries of gulls not actors. It was Rowena Cade who started this wonderful theatre overlooking Porthcurno Bay and the English Channel.  We visited this amazing site whilst on our honeymoon in Cornwall in 1971.  It was an overcast day and a bit blustery but nothing spoilt our visit.  There is a long history attached to the Minack Theatre and you can read all about it on their website, http://www.minack.com/

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Shoreham Bridge

Situated near the mouth of the river Adur in West Sussex. The old bridge crossing the river was built in the 18th century and became a great addition to the history and colour of the area. Time and weather had taken its toll on the bridge and a Community Trust was set up in 2001.  After restoration it was officially re-opened on 23rd October 2008 by the Duke of York

 Looking up at the bridge from the airport (western side)

 Shoreham bridge

View downstream

 Shoreham harbour

 I crossed the bridge many times and was always keen to see if the tide was running in or out. For me this was of great importance, as I needed to make my plans for fishing. Others would stand and watch the flow, swans drifting with the current or wooden planks and logs going down with the tide and perhaps back again as the tide came in. Sometimes we would sit on the grass banks and look on with envy at the adults as they prepared their boats for a fishing trip. When the tide went out there were the mudflats to see and collect some bait.  Mud is such glorious stuff, designed for the express purpose of covering young children’s clothes and for sliding and getting generally very mucky. When the mud dried on your clothes you could crack it off and try to remove the stain that remained. The mud also had a distinctive smell which reminded you of the sea that was so very close. The water would flow toward the sea and cause whirlpools when it passed over a rock or obstacle and past a post. Gradually the boats would sink down and settle on the mud. The birds would arrive and wait by the waters edge until the mud flats became exposed then they would dash forward to catch worms or any bugs which had delayed departure. Cars passing in the distance were forgotten and we thought only of how the water moved and the fish we might expect to catch. Dreams would be disturbed by the sound of a small plane as it passed overhead to Shoreham airport and we would turn and watch the landing, then back to the mesmerising flow.  In the distance you can see Shoreham, a wonderful place to explore on foot. If you would like to know more of the bridge then have a look at the council site below. http://www.adur.gov.uk/tourism/old-tollbridge.htm

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The Sea.

As the clouds dash across the sky the water colour changes with  an accentuation of it’s moods.  It’s only water you may say, but there is power, as this huge body moves under the influence of tide and wind.

 Devon Days.

Land's End

You can always sit and watch the water at any point on the coast of Britain and just observe.  The sky touches the horizon and there are dreams about the adventures out there. There is also the fear that goes with the power concealed in that movement. For me it’s the changes that happen in front of you and the smallest detail can become important, but don’t take my word, give it a try.

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Storm Casualty

Note And Photo From :- Kelowna Trout Angler.

Storm Casualty.

On my way to work after a storm at Brighton, East Sussex, I spotted this ship washed up on the shore near the Place Pier. She was called the Athina B.

Storm Casualty.

It was quite an event and one which the whole family went down to enjoy.  There are lots of articles written about this boat as you would expect so I will spare the detail.  For me it was a strange feeling, to stand on the shingle and wonder at the power of the waves and moving water which had brought this ship ashore.  As the picture shows the storm had done it’s work and now the water looked benign. Gently the ship would rise and fall as a minor swell came in but, for us, the old skimming stones pastime drew us all to the waters edge.

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Floating Pyramids

Note And Photo From :- Kelowna Trout Angler.

Floating Pyramids.

It was some years ago that I went down to Brighton seafront, walking along the promenade from Hove lagoon.

I can’t remember the event that was taking place but I have a feeling it was to celebrate an arts festival.  Perhaps it was the Brighton Festival.  However, these strange new toys were destined to become all the rage.  I was more impressed with the sailing that was going on around the show.

Pyramids At Brighton Beach

The people  would walk around inside the shape and hope that they would move forward. Well, that was the theory, but if the wind blew, then I guess that would be a different story. The crowds were appreciative, but perhaps they only looked on in amusement at a mild form of stupidity.

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Hovercraft

Note And Photos From :- Kelowna Trout Angler.

Hovercraft.

Who can forget the Hovercraft.  There were great hopes for these giants and many believed they were to be the saviour in many marsh type environments. The invention by Cockerwill was a triumph in British technology.  I remember making small versions with biscuit tins and hair dryers, but the sight of the real thing was fantastic.

The first meeting came when I had a chance to cross the English Channel on the car transporter.  I stood on the shore and watched as this great lumbering machine pulled into the harbour, left the water and started to come up onto dry land.  It didn’t seem real, but there it was, all noise and fluttering skirts.

Cars were unloaded and people walked up the slope towards customs. We sat in our cars until the signal was given to start loading and down we went.  It was similar to that of entering any ferry. Once seated you were aware that the engines were powering up and you were starting to float.  Slowly the beast  turned and moved forward.  We were off.

Down the slope we seemed to slide until the the slight bumps told us we were on the sea and gradually entering the channel.  The power increased and the craft bucked a little as it hit the waves.  It lifted high enough to tackle the waves without too much of a problem and the forward speed increased.  Great, unless you were sea sick !  On the journey the sea swell was kind and I remember only the fantastic speed for such a large craft floating on the surface of the water. We passed the ferry and crossed in front of tankers and other large ships on their way to and from the Atlantic.  This had to be the way to travel.

Waiting at Dover.

Hovercraft at Dover

A similar experience on a lesser scale could be enjoyed crossing to the Isle of Wight.  The hovercraft was smaller, but just as impressive.

 Bound for the Isle of Wight

Hovercraft at Southsea

Now, sadly, the hovercraft is no more.  It enjoyed the affections of the public for a short while and now only survives in specialist roles and with hobbyists that keep the spirit alive.

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